Cam Buckle Straps

One of the more useful straps we sell is the Cam Buckle Strap. They offer everything one might want out of a strap:
⇒ strong
⇒ easy to use
⇒ affordable
I carry a number of these in my truck to secure loads and some times they even are used to secure garbage cans.

It’s pretty windy in Cashmere and this truck stop doesn’t want its garbage cans flying away.

For 2021 we have changed the cam buckle used in our straps. It is now a zinc coated steel buckle which is much stronger than what we previously used.

New steel cam buckle

It has a breaking strength of 1100 pounds and buying them in volume has allowed us to upgrade the webbing we use to a much stronger grade at the same pricing.

Nylon webbing

Our nylon straps are available in black, royal blue (shown above), red and yellow. The webbing has a breaking strength of 2750 pounds although the weak point on the strap is the buckle. The raw end is cut at an angle to make insertion into the buckle simple and it is heat sealed.

Polypropylene webbing

The polypropylene version only comes in black and the webbing has a breaking strength of 800 pounds. There isn’t much of a price difference between the nylon and polypropylene version, it boils down to which webbing is best for your application.

Cam Buckle Straps

Both of these models are much superior to what we have been able to offer in the past with no increase in price. Give them a try, I think you will like them.

All Tied Down

The other day I received a call from the owner of a Murphy Bed. He wanted to add straps to keep the mattress from moving when folding up the bed.

Coming up with the straps was the easy part but how to attach them to the wooden frame wasn’t quite as obvious. We came up with two easy options.

If you are using wider webbing a pair of screws with finish washers will work.

Sheet Metal Screw & Finish Washer

Your local hardware store will probably carry all you need. I picked these up this morning, screw and washer cost around $0.25. Fold the webbing over so the screw goes through 2 layers.

1.5″ webbing with screws and finish washers

If you are looking for an even more “finished” (pun intended) look, use Footman’s Loops.

1″ webbing with footman’s loop

This method requires either sewing a loop into the end of the webbing or using a slide to form a loop. Not quite as handy as the first option.

Both provide plenty of strength. If you have screws and flat washers on hand they will work too. Screws without a washer might pull through some types of webbing and would not be a technique I would recommend.

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New March 2021

We have a couple of new products in stock.

Cam Buckle & G-Hook

They are both designed for 1″ webbing and are made from steel. The cam buckle has a protective zinc coating and an 1100 pound breaking strength. This is the strongest cam buckle we carry.

Also new is a steel G-Hook with a black powder coating sized for 1″ webbing. These will hook into MOLLE or a loop made from 1″ webbing and provide adjustment so you can cinch down your load. While not as light as aluminum or plastic they have a nice profile and really work well.

Buy Cam Buckles

Buy G-Hooks

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Shipping to the UK

1 January 2021

Brexit has happened and one of the consequences was a change in how the UK tax authorities are dealing with import shipments. Now the exporter (for instance Straps to Go) is required to create an account with UK Tax and collect VAT on all shipments going to the UK. The exporter must then file a statement quarterly with UK Tax and remit and taxes collected.

For an exporter this requires enough business in the UK to cover the costs of managing the receipts and reimbursement to the government. Straps to Go is not in the position to handle this burden.

The only option that is available to us is to ship by United Parcel Service. This is much more expensive than putting something in the mail, additionally UPS uses a Customs Broker to handle collection of taxes and duties and they charge the importer for this service on top of the shipping costs.

There seem to be exceptions for Business to Business sales where the importer can provide us with their VAT Registration Number. I am not sure how the US Postal System will deal with this so if you are a business wishing to import from us please give us the particulars and we will investigate further.

At £135 the rules change again since duty will be collected. Again, contact us if you have an order that exceeds this amount.

Otherwise we have no economical way to ship to the UK at this time.

Further reading from UK.gov

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Head Retention Strap for Cervical Traction Device

Last winter my wife slipped on the ice and messed up her neck/shoulder. She has found a great Physical Therapist at Therapeutic Associates in Selah, WA and on one of her visits they put a clean pillow case over her head so that the strap on the device wouldn’t touch her. Sorry to say they didn’t take a photo but she did ask why they weren’t using easy to clean straps.

Measurements were taken and prototypes made. Remeasure and another round of prototypes and then they took her off that machine and on to a Saunders Cervical Traction Device. Another hard to clean strap there so we designed one using easy to clean BioThane material that the staff and patients seem to like.

BioThane head restraint strap

Full specifications for the Head Restraint Strap

This strap can be cleaned using disinfectants already on hand and in this era of COVID-19 that is quite important.

Straps to Go manufactures a number of straps for medical use and supplies buckles made by ACW (Acculoc brand) for replacement uses. Medical Straps & Hardware web page.

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DIY Hand Sanitizer Holder

Watching TV today I saw an ad for the WeatherTech CupFone with a new feature, a holder for hand sanitizer. The ad talks about how you can never find your phone or hand sanitizer in your car and they are right.

Several months ago I had the same problem. Where in the world is that bottle of hand sanitizer? We have come to like the product made by Heritage Distilling which is a local company. It comes in booze bottles so we found smaller plastic containers that we could use in our cars. Mine is cylindrical in shape and turned out to be very elusive.

A bit of ballistic nylon and a snap later and I had a holster for the bottle. I screwed the male portion of the snap in to my center console, trucks these days have plenty of plastic, and after a few months it continues to perform flawlessly. The bottle is a TSA approved size and it snaps closed nicely and doesn’t leak.

Any fabric would work. Ballistic nylon is nice since it is very stiff. Lighter material might need more folds at the top or a piece of wire inserted so that it stays open- along with quick draw it is nice to be able to drop the container back in. This is a project that only took a few minutes, but then again we have sewing machines set up all the time.

If you want to try the Heritage Distilling hand sanitizer, at least in Washington State Costco is carrying it.

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Support your US based suppliers

A customer wanted a strap that used a buckle that I don’t carry, nor do any of my domestic suppliers. The customer sent me a link so I could buy them online. The problem was the supplier was located in China.

I had to turn this project down. Why?

When we source a product from a domestic supplier, either manufacturer or importer, they provide us with product liability coverage for their products. Importers located in the United States will either carry their own insurance or work with the overseas manufacturer so they carry insurance that covers sales in the United States.

If we were to order product directly from China through an online e-commerce site there isn’t any insurance coverage. Any liability falls directly on the importer, most of whom do not realize the risk they are assuming.

Don’t Amazon, ebay or other e-commerce sites protect their customers based in the United States?

Not if you are buying from a “Third Party Seller” which is what any company shipping from overseas would be. Forget any help, you are on your own.

What is the solution?

Simple, buy from a company based in the United States!

OK, what if you are living outside the United States?

If something were to go wrong, really wrong you are still protected by our insurance. It might be a mess but at least you have options.

Just trying to return a product will still be difficult just due to the cost of transport and that is not what I am discussing.


Westpac Marine, the parent company of Straps to Go has been in business since February 14, 1984. We used to service marine lifesaving equipment and understand the product liability implications from that high risk business. We have been sued for problems with imported products and through this process learned what needed to be done to protect both ourselves and our customers.

This is a crazy world we live in and it seems not a week goes by when you don’t read about a problem with a product that just shouldn’t have any issues. Dog leashes were in the news not too long ago, breaking and injuring the user (human not canine).

We don’t sell products that fail to carry product liability insurance.
We don’t make straps that are destined to fail.
We care about our customers and their safety.

Shock Absorbing Nylon Webbing?

A large industrial supply company advertises “shock-absorbing nylon webbing”.What is it and how does it differ from standard nylon webbing?

All nylon products stretch. That is the nature of the material and if we were talking about rope, it would be described as a “dynamic” product. If you were rock climbing and fell, you wouldn’t want to be tethered to the mountain with a steel cable where there would be no give when it got fully extended. Your body would be a wreck. One climbing rope manufacturer says their dynamic ropes provide a “soft catch”. In the marine industry nylon is used for anchor and mooring lines but never as a tow line.

Polyester fibers provide little stretch. In the rope world they comprise what are known as “static” ropes. Sheets and halyards on a sailboat along with tow lines all need to be static ropes.

In the webbing world the terms static and dynamic are rarely used. If you are designing a dog leash there will never be enough of a load that the user could tell the difference. Other factors are more important, how does it feel in your hand, does it come in the right color and what is the cost are all common areas of interest. Unless you are making fall prevention or load securing gear, static or dynamic hardly comes in to play.

Now to answer the question-

All nylon webbing is shock absorbing, or dynamic. You can check out our nylon webbing options to see what we stock. The thinner the webbing, for example #630 is thinner than #7400, the more it will stretch for a given load but they all stretch- or are shock-absorbing.

Interested in ‘static’ webbing? Polyester is the way to go. It is more expensive than nylon and color options are very limited.

Berry Compliant Buckles & Webbing

The Berry Amendment mandates that the Defense Department gives preference to items made in the United States out of domestic materials when purchasing fabric products (and others).

In the case of webbing and buckles, that means that not only does the product need to be made in the U.S.A. but all of the raw materials must be made here. Nylon fiber, raw plastics for buckles, dyes, the list goes on. Once a manufacture has their raw materials they must be converted to a finished product in the United States.

Some products are easy to source. Most of the plastic buckles that we purchase from American Cord & Webbing (ACW) are Berry Compliant. Webbing is more difficult. Polypropylene webbing is for the most part imported. Manufacturers will import nylon fiber and convert it in to webbing in the US. That product is not Berry Compliant since the fiber is imported. It can be labeled as Made in the USA which only requires that the majority of the cost is based in the USA.

All of this started in 1941 by Representative Ellis Yarnall Berry and it has been amended several times since then. In 2009 Congressman Larry Kissell brought similar requirements for textile and apparel products purchased by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

  • If your customer is asking for Berry Compliant products they should come with a Certificate of Compliance.
  • Made in the U.S.A. is not a guarantee that the product is Berry Compliant.
  • If your supplier does not know about Berry Compliance it is doubtful that their products make the grade.
  • Expect to pay more for Berry Compliant products, especially webbing.
  • You might run in to minimum order quantities greater than for non-Berry products.

Pew Straps

Social distancing is a fact of life now. Keeping our “customers and employees” safe is a requirement. A few days ago I was contacted to see if we could make webbing straps to block off pews in a church. The customer sent the above photo to show what he was looking for (he already had the signs).

Together we designed a strap that was adjustable from 33″ to 59″ with snaps on each end to attach to the pews.

Pew Wrangler

1″ standard weight polypropylene webbing with a black oxide coated snap on each end. Simply adjusted using the slide and there are no components that can get lost.

Screw Stud

The strap connects to the wooden pews using a screw stud at each end. This makes it easy to move from place to place or remove when social distancing isn’t a requirement.

We can make them in all the colors of standard weight polypropylene webbing we stock and we can change the length to suit your needs. Churches, courtrooms, meeting halls all could use these straps. Different attachments are possible either out of plastic or metal.

Give us a call at (253) 627-6000 to discuss your application.